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HOW WE REAFFOREST

TREES SHOULDN'T JUST BE PLANTED.
THEY HAVE TO BE GROWN.

Harsh dry periods combined with the extreme sunlight intensity in the tropics make it very hard for seedlings of most species to survive their first year. Moreover, many of the species we reintroduce can only survive under a canopy similar to a rainforest. Such that once a forest is clearcut, those species simply disappeared from the region.

Our network of 1,200 beneficiaries, alongside the innovative practices we implement, helps us alleviate these challenges. Our beneficiaries provide the care required for seedlings to reach maturity and the Cajanus seeds we supply to them build the much-needed canopy.

WE MULTIPLY INDIGENOUS TREES TO ENHANCE LOCAL BIODIVERSITY

Indigenous trees are the basis of ecosystems. Their leaves, bark, and roots host billions of animals, insects, bacteria, mycelium, etc. To give you an example, a cup of soil hosts more micro-organisms than there are humans on earth. And because each species hosts its particular species above or underground, the biggest diversity of trees is needed. We multiply and distribute a total of 40 different tree species that we gather within a radius of 100 km.

You will find in this list all our 40 tree species and their common name. The last column describes the percentage that each species makes up this year compared to the overall number of seedlings distributed.

Species

Common Name

% of Total Seedlings Number

Acacia ssp. “ekwam”

 

0.4%

Acacia polyacantha

 

6.8%

Albizia coriara

 

2.0%

Aleurites moluccanus

Candle Nut

0.1%

Antiaris toxicaria

 

11.6%

Artocarpus heterophyllus

Jackfruit

1.0%

Bischofia javanica

 

9.1%

Carica papaya

Papaya

0.7%

Casimiroa edulis

White sapote

1.5%

Ceiba pentandra

Cotton tree

0.7%

Citrus limon

Lemon

2.8%

Citrus sinensis

Orange

1.2%

Croton megalocarpus

 

8.5%

Dovyalis caffra

Kay Apple

0.1%

Erythrina abyssinica

 

1.4%

Ficus “ebechel”

 

0.5%

Ficus “ebule”

 

0.2%

Harungana madagascariensis

 

4.8%

Khaya anthotheca

Mahogani

0.4%

Kigelia africana

 

0.8%

Maesopsis eminii

 

10.2%

Mangifera indica

Mango

0.3%

Markhamia lutea

 

4.4%

Melia azedarach

 

11.2%

Monodora myristica

 

2.0%

Moringa oleifera

Moringa

1.9%

Morus alba

Mullberry

2.1%

Olea capensis

Elgon Teck

0.5%

Poliscias fulva

 

0.2%

Prunus africana

 

7.0%

Sesbania sesban

 

1.8%

Spathodea campanulata

 

1.1%

Ssp. “Ekimeng”

 

0.0%

Ssp. “Ekor”

 

1.3%

Ssp. “Ekubwai”

 

0.0%

Strombosius schefflerii

 

1.0%

Syzygium cumini

Mzambarao

0.9%

Tamarindus indica

Tamarindo

0.9%

Trelipsium madagascariensis

 

0.4%

Zanthoxylum giletii

 

0.5%

YES, WE DISTRIBUTE TREE SEEDLINGS FOR FREE

Because 90% of our beneficiaries are low-income farmers, giving free goods or services is part of our DNA. However, giving for free comes with its challenges, and we had to make sure that our tree seedlings are given the best treatment.

Moreover, the first year is the most critical period for tree seedlings’ survival. Therefore, we emphasize following up on each project during this period, which tremendously increases seedlings’ chances of one day reaching the adult stage.

Here are the main steps we follow to ensure that our tree seedlings are handled with the biggest care. It is all about ensuring that our beneficiaries are truly willing to receive and commit to taking care of the seedlings.

We visit communities and schools to sensitize them about indigenous trees. Then we take tree orders from potential beneficiaries. Candidates for tree planting are required to form groups of 15 members.

Distribution of Cajanus seeds
Cajanus seeds are distributed to each candidate and within 3 months they will form a canopy to protect our tree seedlings from the harsh sunlight.

Site visit
An assesment of each candidate’s survival of Cajanus seedlings is performed, which determines his/her eligibility to receive the tree seedlings he/she requested.

We hold a requisition meeting to assign tree species that suit best to each project’s climatic conditions.

An assortment of 80 indigenous tree seedlings with 10% fruit trees is prepared and distributed to each beneficiary. The fruit trees (e.g. mango tree, papaya tree, etc.) are not stricly indigenous, but they have been in Africa for centuries and we distribute them for their nutritional value.

We keep in touch with each beneficiary and follow up on the health of tree seedlings throughout the year.

We conduct an impact assessment after a year in January, where we visit each project to assess the survival rate of the trees. This activity greatly helps receive feedbacks from beneficiaries to improve the way we deliver impact.

We reward beneficiaries who succeed to keep a high survival rate of our seedlings after a year with a – highly demanded – improved stove (that reduces households’ usage of firewood by 66%). Those beneficiaries also become eligible to receive new seedlings the following year together with lessons of organic farming.