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WHY

TREES?

In developing countries, trees are at the heart of countless services that communities receive from nature daily.

Globally, trees have the potential to make up a big part of the solution against climate change.

 

Trees in the tropics grow up to 6 times faster than in temperate areas. And they store huge amounts of CO2.

TREES ARE:

GOOD TO OTHER LIVING BEINGS

Trees are associated with all the benefits that humans receive from nature. Their roots dig holes in the soil that help replenish water tables, their dead leaves feed soil organisms thereby boosting soil fertility, and so on.

GOOD TO THE CLIMATE

At the local level in the tropics, they act as a global air cooling system by preventing the sun from hitting the ground, while the immense quantities of water vapor that they reject in the air participate in the creation of clouds.

GOOD TO PEOPLE

Globally, 600 million people directly depend on trees to survive. But the whole humanity depends on them indirectly.

Why It Matters

How Trees Benefit People

CLIMATE

Climate change has already started to affect the lives of communities in developing countries. Heavy droughts are followed by flooding and so on.

Trees can mitigate this in the short and long run, at a local and global scale.

FIREWOOD

In rural communities, families depend on firewood to cook. In some cases, a family can spend up to 20 hours per week searching for firewood.

By providing families with trees, we enable children to go to study instead of looking for firewood.

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FOOD

Annual crops (e.g. maize, beans, etc.) suffer most from climate change due to their shallow root systems. 

Trees help people set up agroforestry systems that have shown promising results in increasing farmers’ incomes and food diversity.

MEDICINE

75% of the world’s population uses traditional medicine as their primary source of medical treatment.

Trees provide remedies that have been used for centuries, and are essential elements of the local culture.

SOIL FERTILITY

Climate change and biodiversity loss are threatening conventional farm systems. Unsustainable practices further escalate disparities.

Trees produce organic content (litter) that boosts soil fertility. This, in turn, increases fungi presence in soils, which further enhances trees growth and soil fertility.

BIODIVERSITY

In some European countries, 70% of insects have disappeared in the last 30 years. Farm systems with no trees lead to biodiversity loss.

Trees are the home to a big part of the living beings. They help life underground to thrive, and they provide food to animals like mammals and birds.

How We Work

WE PLANT HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF TREES

Since 2017, we have freely distributed 135,896 trees of +40 species to privates and institutions.

With the funds remaining from tree planting, we work on improving their self-reliance through environmental teachings, energy-efficient stoves building, and organic farming training.